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Summer School 2014

GEOCROWD Summer School on Data Management for Crowdsourced and Volunteered Geographic Information

Dates

14.7.-17.7.2014 

Location

Parliament Hall, University of St Andrews, UK

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/visiting/about/virtualtours/parliamenthall/

Program

The program consists of a total of 8 full sessions each lasting 3 hours and including the following types of sessions:
  • ESR & CGI Presentations – 20min presentations of participating students and researchers.
  • Keynote Lecture – 1h talks given by invited speakers.
  • Tutorial – 2h tutorial session given by invited speaker.
  • Mentored sessions – discussion around certain themes assisted by present speakers/scientists.
 
Day Time Session

14.07.2014

09:00-09:30

Opening and Introduction

14.07.2014

09:30-10:30

Keynote Lecture: Mike Goodchild

14.07.2014

11:00-13:00

ESR Presentations

14.07.2014

14:00-16:00

ESR Presentations

14.07.2014

16:30-17:30

Mentoring Session: Publications and Presentations

15.07.2014

09:30-10:30

 Keynote Lecture: Steffen Fritz

15.07.2014

11:00-13:00

ESR Presentations

15.07.2014

14:00-16:00

Tutorial in ICDE: Andreas Züfle

15.07.2014

16:30-17:30

Mentoring Session: Grant Applications

17.07.2014

09:30-10:30

 Keynote Lecture: Carson Farmer

17.07.2014

11:00-12:00

Mentoring Session: Career Development

17.07.2014

12:00-13:00

GEOCROWD PI Meeting

17.07.2014

13:00-15:00

ESR & CGI Presentations

Speakers

The following invited speakers have accepted giving a talk at the summer school. The talk titles are tentative.

Prof. Mike Goodchild

University of California, Santa Barbara

VGI Transforming the World

Abstract:

Early research on volunteered geographic information focused on crowdsourcing as challenging traditional methods of production, and the immediate issues of quality, the scope of VGI, and its societal impacts. Several years and many publications later it is possible to identify research issues that reflect the longer-term, more fundamental effects of citizen engagement. The presentation focuses on three of these: the challenge VGI presents to some of the traditional geospatial data products, exemplified by soil mapping; a renewed emphasis on place over space; and the human tendency to see geographic information as a social construction. All three represent an increasingly humanist perspective on the production of geographic information.

Prof. Steffen Fritz

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Austria

Environmental Data collection using crowdsourcing: applications in the field of land cover and land-use 

Abstract

There is considerable potential in using crowdsourcing to improve land-use and land cover information, either via desktop or mobile platforms, which is the subject of the summer school seminar that will be given by Dr. Steffen Fritz. The seminar will start with an overview of current crowdsourcing efforts and serious games that have helped scientific research such as Galaxy Zoo and Fold-It. More specific geographical examples will then be presented, i.e. Open Street Map (OSM) and the Geo-Wiki project. Geo-Wiki is a visualization, crowdsourcing and validation tool for improving global land cover and land-use using Google Earth and Bing maps. Dr. Fritz will demonstrate Geo-Wiki (www.geo-wiki.org), which is comprised of several branches that are devoted to different types of land cover and land-use, e.g. improving cropland, urban extent, biomass characterization and land cover more generally. Dr. Fritz will then present an overview of the data collection campaigns that have been run using Geo- wiki, in which more than 250,000 samples of land cover and human impact have been compiled. Examples of where the data have been used in research will also be presented, e.g. in validating a map of land availability for biofuel production, and in the development of a global hybrid cropland map.

An overview of other recent developments will then be provided. The first is the mobile application called Geo-Wiki Pictures for Windows, Android and iPhone. This app allows users to take pictures of the landscape and then classify the land cover or collect other thematic data such as crop type. The pictures can be viewed online via the Pictures Geo-Wiki branch and shared with friends. The second is the Cropland Capture game, which ran for 6 months from mid-November to mid-May 2014, in which more than 4.5 million sample points were collected on the presence of cropland. The results of the game will be presented including player performance and how the data will be used in the future for land cover calibration and validation.

Dr Fritz will close the seminar with an outlook to future work, in particular the potential of crowdsourcing to collect in-situ land cover and land–use information from different communities such as via farmers and the general public who are interested in participating in citizen science.

Dr Carson Farmer

Center for Advanced Research of Spatial Information (CARSI) and Hunter College, City University of New York

Streaming GIScience: Data as flows, flows as data

Abstract

In this talk, Dr. Carson Farmer talks about flows in terms of sources of information (i.e., social information flows/sources) and as data themselves (i.e., human mobility flows/movements). He suggests that in order to avoid the limitations of current data storage, management, and retrieval practices, a focus on real-time, intelligent analysis of data in a streaming framework is the most logical step forward for GIScience. To illustrate this point, Dr. Farmer talks about two projects in development that focus on flows: The first project focuses on real-time streaming analysis of social media sources for event detection. It uses streaming Twitter data, along with tools for real-time semantic and spatial analysis. The second project focuses real-time environmental monitoring using vehicle trajectories in urban environments. The research is based on the EnviroCar project, which is a collaboration between institutions in Germany, the UK, and the US. This projects collects vehicle traces annotated with vehicle efficiency information (e.g., CO2 output, fuel consumption, etc), and may eventually enable continuous monitoring of the environmental effects of vehicles in urban environments.

Dr Andreas Züfle

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Managing Uncertainty in Spatial and Spatio-temporal Data

Abstract

Location-related data has a tremendous impact in many applications of high societal relevance and its growing volume from heterogeneous sources is one true example of a Big Data. An inherent property of any spatio-temporal dataset is uncertainty due to various sources of imprecision. This tutorial provides a comprehensive overview of the different challenges involved in managing uncertain spatial and spatio-temporal data and presents state-of-the-art techniques for addressing them.

Attending Mentors

  1. Christian Freksa, Universitaet Bremen, Germany
  2. Thomas Barkowsky, Universitaet Bremen, Germany
  3. A. Stewart Fotheringham, University of St. Andrews, UK
  4. Dimitrios Skoutas, National Technical University of Athens, Greece

Attending PhD Students and Scientists

  1. Katarzyna Siła-Nowicka, University of St. Andrews, UK
  2. Taylor Oshan, University of St. Andrews, UK
  3. Jan Vandrol, University of St. Andrews, UK
  4. Pratanu Roy, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich
  5. Sophia Karagiorgou, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
  6. Laura Radaelli, Aarhus University, Denmark
  7. Alkyoni Baglatzi, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
  8. Rami Alsalman, Universitaet Bremen, Germany
  9. Alexandros Belesiotis, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
  10. Georgios Skoumas, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
  11. Christodoulos Efstathiades, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
  12. Kostas Patroumpas, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
  13. Dimitris Karampinas, National Technical University of Athens, Greece
  14. Dr Iain Dillingham, University of St. Andrews, UK
  15. Dr Jing Yao, University of St. Andrews, UK
  16. Dr Wenbai Yang, University of St. Andrews, UK